Today in Research: Latest Smoking Numbers; a Brown Rice Movement

Discovered: how many smokers actually quit, a theoretical planet catapulted out of the solar system, a truism that turns out to be true, the benefits of brown rice and an 11/11/11 stat.

  • Latest smoking numbers: most people still have a rough time quitting. So, it looks like not much seems to have changed, does it? A few days after a federal judge delayed disgusting new warning labels from being plastered on cigarette boxes (which, by the way, may not work that well), a CDC research report finds that in 2010, 69 percent of smokers want to quit, but six percent do. And, even though smokers have indicated they'd like to kick the habit, as The Wall Street Journal reported, it doesn't look like many were being that proactive: "Those who try to quit can double or triple their chances with counseling or medications, but most of those who did try to quit in 2010 didn't use either. Nor did they receive advice on how to quit from a doctor." [The Wall Street Journal]
  • Brown rice is, uh, not just for hippies anymore. This New York Times trend piece aside, the so-called brown rice movement (is that a thing?) got a boost from proper diet-minded researchers today who are touting its properties (along with other things like porridge and any high-fiber type foods) as a way to ward off cancer: "Compared with the lowest levels of fiber consumption, each 10 gram per day increase in intake of total dietary fiber and cereal fiber was associated with a 10 percent reduced risk of colorectal [colon] cancer." This cancer reducing property, The Guardian notes, appears to be particular to the rices and porridges: there wasn't evidence that fruits and veggies do the same thing for your health. [USA Today, The Guardian]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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