Today in Research: The True Costs of Drinking; Happiness Is Relative

Today in research: the young are mostly just happy to be working, making "tractor beams" real, binge drinking's cost per drink, and the latest thing to worry about with cell phones.

  • Happiness is a relative term. Today, The Wall Street Journal reported on a study by Mercer consulting that found that young people are happier in their workplace than older co-workers. The results, which appear to be from a June survey, could be viewed with glass half-full optimism. But then The Journal enlists a few consultants to give their theories about the findings. "Twenty-somethings may see a job in a 'short-term, transactional way,' [said one consultant]. 'They don't necessarily think 'Where do I fit in with this employer?'" And: "The relative happiness of the younger workers may also be a reflection of how unhappy the older group is, says Colleen O'Neill, a senior partner at Mercer." [The Wall Street Journal via Gawker]
  • Will binge drinkers take note? The Centers for Disease Control is out with a new report gauging how much money binge drinking has cost society as far as health concerns, drunk driving accidents and other things. Unfortunately, as the Associated Press reports, the number that they tout "$2 per drink, in terms of medical expenses and other costs to society" doesn't seem like a very intimidating figure even though it probably should be. The number is extrapolated from the CDC report saying that binge drinking cost everyone $224 billion in 2006. [Associated Press]

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