Today in Research: Broccoli's Super Benefits; the Yogurt Debate

Discovered: the Michael Jordan's of living longer, one good thing about yogurt, the composition of super broccoli, how common binge-eating is, and bit of unwitting dodgeball

  • Nutrient-pumped broccoli gets time in the spotlight. By which we mean that the Associated Press has a widely circulated profile of "super broccoli," and the scientists who have newly unveiled a version of the vegetable in Britain. What makes the broccoli "super" is that it is pumped full of "glucoraphanin, a nutrient believed to help ward off heart disease," the article informs, noting that it's been sold as Beneforte in select U.S. markets and that it has not been submitted to the European Safety Agency to discern it's real health benefits. So, maybe not technically super yet. And the taste wasn't special: "An AP reporter who tasted the new broccoli found it was the same as the regular broccoli. Scientists, however, said it should taste slightly sweeter because it contains less sulphur." [Associated Press]
  • The theory that microorganisms in yogurt 'are good for you' is debatable. The theory that microorganisms in yogurt 'are good for you' is debatable. We didn't know that. But, a new yogurt study that did investigate the health benefits of the snack in mice and humans did find another thing that it was maybe, possibly good for (the researchers appeared hesitant to draw conclusions): "yogurt may indeed be helpful, perhaps by helping microbes found naturally in the digestive system process carbohydrates," wrote The Washington Post. A different account of the study in Nature, notes that the yogurts tested "have only subtle effects on the bacteria already in the gut and do not replace them." [Nature, The Washington Post]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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