Today in Research: The Brain Can Continue to Develop; More

Today in research: a bit of mind reading, getting shorter, mimicking Scrubs, and learning that your brain keeps on developing.

  • In fairness to the brain, it doesn't just shrink. Previously, says this new bit of research, most people thought that your brain stopped developing during adolescence. Not so. It seems that starting a career or going to college can be just as brain enhancing as going through your formative years, finds a brain-scanning study from the University of Alberta. Now if you add a bit of golf to the mix.... [Eurekalert - Press Release]
  • There aren't many good options for the depressed. Sure, the Reuters report on a meta-analysis of research leads with an important new finding that the "depressed may be a little more likely than others to suffer a stroke down the road." Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be much that a person is supposed to do with that information. Take antidepressants? Well, an earlier study found that "depressed people who take antidepressants appeared to have an increased risk of stroke compared with depressed people who weren't on the drugs." [Reuters Health]

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