A Few New Yorkers Will Go to Great Lengths to Keep Smoking

The City of New York proudly announced on Thursday that the portion of its population that smokes had dropped to 14 percent -- the lowest in the city's history. It has high tobacco prices, strict anti-smoking laws, and an aggressively graphic ad campaign to thank for that. But it will probably be very difficult to stub out the habits of the remaining hold-outs. Despite some of the toughest anti-smoking measures in the country, New Yorkers will go to great lengths to avoid the city's tax rate. We've rounded up a few, below.

  • Buy Not in Bulk: A hefty bundle of taxes means a pack of cigarettes costs about $14.50 in New York City. But smokers who can't afford that kind of bite and still want to light up often go for individual smokes, called loosies, which can be found on a lot of city street corners. Back in April, the New York Times reported that the single-cigarette trade was booming, as smokers on a budget felt a lot more comfortable parting with 75 cents for a cigarette than $14 for 20.
  • Roll it Yourself: A lot of New York smokers buy loose tobacco and a cheap hand-held cigarette roller in order to squeeze more cigarettes out of their purchase. A pack of loose tobacco costs about the same as pre-rolled, but comes with a book of 50 papers, which you can use most of if you're conservative.

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