Infographic: Why Insects Are the Most Eco-Friendly Meat

The September issue of The Atlantic is live—and with it my piece on how the Netherlands is hoping to convince the world to eat mealworms and locusts. Entomophagy, as insect-eating is officially known, is actually being taken seriously these days by a hardcore group of enthusiasts and scientists around the world (coincidentally, The New Yorker also published an article on the phenomenon this week, although it focused more on fancy insect gastronomy in the U.S., as opposed to the processed insect-containing snacks invented by the Dutch).

What's causing the bug boom? One big reason: as this infographic shows, insects are far more environmentally friendly than conventional meat, an advantage advocates love to flaunt. Enjoy ... and then decide whether you'll enjoy some grasshoppers.

eating-insects.jpeg


Image: Food Service Warehouse

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Daniel Fromson, a former associate editor at The Atlantic, is a writer based in Washington, D.C. He writes regularly for The Washington Post. His work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, New York, and Slate.

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