Time to Start Worrying About Your Worrying, Studies Say

The Atlantic Wire's Rebecca Greenfield reports on a new study from Case Western University:

Neurotics who obsess over inane minutiae have another thing to worry about: how much they're worrying. A study from Case Western University finds that excessive worriers not only hurt themselves but also alienate their peers. A person's mental anxiety interferes with their relationship. Not only do worriers push away their friends and loved ones, but the overly concerned also face other health issues. So stop worrying! Science says so!

Worriers justify their mental obsessions claiming their anxious thoughts translate into real world progress. For example, people tend to worry about their families and friends. They think this magically improves their relationships. "The negative methods they use to cope--from over nurturing to extreme detachment—may be destructive," the study finds.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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