The Food World's Oscars: Fun and Wisdom at the Beard Awards

The gastronomy might have been glitzy, but food politics is anything but, and this year's awards celebrated both

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I'm just back to (gray, chilly) Boston from (sparkling, perfect-spring-day) New York, where I began the annual James Beard Awards weekend Friday night at the Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards to cheer on the Life channel's Joe Fassler, whose superb series on last summer's Salmonella scandal was nominated in a very competitive category, Health and Nutrition. Our esteemed colleagues at EatingWell won, but it was a great honor and great to see him there.

And I was particularly pleased and proud for our own Barry Estabrook, whose regular dispatches are a mainstay of the channel, and have been since the day we began as the Food channel. Barry won for the unimaginably crowded category of Individual Food Blog for his Politics of the Plate, where he instantly posted a typically gracious acknowledgment of the channel and our ace Dan Fromson. (The complete list of Beard winners is here, in PDF form.) And he's already written a typically terrific post on the Life channel today, on a new study that chips away at the myth that farmers' markets are more expensive than supermarkets.

In Andrés's ecstatic, and long, acceptance speech he said, "Food is the most powerful thing we have in our hands. Not only chefs, but everyone in the food community."

An aside that's to my mind anything but: Barry's piece this morning is one part of the why-have-we-waited-so-long strikeback at the myth that sustainability-minded foodies are elitist. We began a strong-minded debate based on the (I think) misguided and misjudged piece in the magazine by B.R. Myers, with Nicolette Hahn Niman's excellent defense of social responsibility in eating choices, and the choices she and her husband, Bill, make in raising animals for meat. That was followed by James McWilliam's own skepticism that raising animals to eat them can ever be defended, a position that puts him at loggerheads with Niman though both share many core values—but that's the value of debate!

And valiant blows in the fight against the "elitist" slur we've taken for too long were struck recently at The Atlantic Food Summit, in Alice Waters's tweets and her own stirring, beautifully spoken speech suggesting universal free school lunch and, later that week by Eric Schlosser's op-ed in The Washington Post, "Why Being a Foodie Isn't 'Elitist'"—a piece that you need to read right now if you missed it, because it sets the terms of the food and social justice debate for the next few years.

The Beard Awards came to their glittery conclusion last night at the gala at Lincoln Center, where the literal climax and for me most important moment was the award to José Andrés as Outstanding Chef. Andrés has been growing in stature and creativity, applying his exuberant passion to matters everyone at the Food Summit—where he was the most passionate speaker in a group of people who know and speak their own minds—cared about. At Friday's awards, the sense that this would be Andrés's year began to build when a "60 Minutes" piece on Andrés, produced by Bill Owens and Kara Vaccaro, won for best television segment.

In accepting his award, Andrés echoed points he made here in a piece last September on the importance of public funding to feed children well, Waters's subject at the Summit. In his ecstatic, and long, acceptance speech he said, "Food is the most powerful thing we have in our hands. Not only chefs, but everyone in the food community. The right use of food can end hunger." He said something very close to a group assembled for The Atlantic last week at a pre-White House Correspondent's Dinner evening, and with similar fire. And I'm very taken with Andrés's food—not just the fantastically luxurious jamon Ibérico and caviar he served at the gala last night but also more I'm writing about for our next issue of our magazine.

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Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." More

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." Julia Child once said, "I think he's a very good food writer. He really does his homework. As a reporter and a writer he takes his work very seriously." Kummer's 1990 Atlantic series about coffee was heralded by foodies and the general public alike. The response to his recommendations about coffees and coffee-makers was typical--suppliers scrambled to meet the demand. As Giorgio Deluca, co-founder of New York's epicurean grocery Dean & Deluca, says: "I can tell when Corby's pieces hit; the phone doesn't stop ringing." His book, The Joy of Coffee, based on his Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." In nominating his work for a National Magazine Award (for which he became a finalist), the editors wrote: "Kummer treats food as if its preparation were something of a life sport: an activity to be pursued regularly and healthfully by knowledgeable people who demand quality." Kummer's book The Pleasures of Slow Food celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995 and 1996 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He is also a frequent food commentator on television and radio. He was educated at Yale, immediately after which he came to The Atlantic. He is the recipient of five James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.

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