Paralyzed Man Stands Thanks to Experimental Spine Implant

Rob Summers stunned doctors at the University of Louisville when, for the first time in five years, he stood on his own two feet. Paralyzed from the waist down after being hit by a car at age 20, the former Oregon State baseball player may one day step back into the batters box thanks to an electrical stimulator attached to his spine. His gleeful reaction is priceless not only for the double entendre but also for the reminder of how historical this medical breakthrough could be. "It was unbelievable," Summers told the New York Times. "There was so much going through my head at that point; I was amazed, was in shock."

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