USDA and Health and Human Services Release New Dietary Guidelines

>Today the government released its new Dietary Guidelines for Americans, USA Today reports, a set of health recommendations published every five years. Although the guidelines reinforce conventional wisdom regarding the virtues of fruits and vegetables, they take a firm, new stance on health issues such as sodium. The government now urges people to consume less salt and sugar and integrate more seafood and whole grains into their diets. Among the report's 23 recommendations:

Consume fewer calories from solid fats and added sugars.

Eat more fruits and vegetables.

Choose a variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red and orange vegetables, beans and peas.

Consume at least half of all grains as whole grains. Increase whole-grain intake by replacing refined grains with whole grains.

Increase the amounts of fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese and fortified soy beverages.

Use oils to replace solid fats where possible.

Read the full story at USA Today.

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John Hendel is a writer based in Washington, DC, and a former producer at The Atlantic.

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