More Bad Food Stamp News: Enrollment Has Skyrocketed

More
Nestle_foodstamps_12-13_post.jpg

SpecialKRB/flickr


The USDA has posted shocking increases in the use and cost of food stamps (renamed the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, just within the last two years). The USDA data and statistics web pages provide data for SNAP participation and costs from 1969 to 2010.

Here's what's happened in the last three years:

    • 2008: 28.2 million participants received an average benefit of $102 per month for a total cost of $37.6 billion.

    • 2009: 33.5 million participants received an average benefit of $125 per month for a total cost of $53.6 billion.

    • 2010: 40.3 million participants received an average benefit of $134 per month for a total cost of $68.2 billion.

Caroline Scott-Thomas of FoodNavigator.com points out that in 2009 eligible people were signing up for SNAP benefits at an average rate of 20,000 a day. This year, the rate increased to 22,000 a day.

What, she asked, did I think of all this?

Nutrition professor Dr. Marion Nestle told FoodNavigator-USA.com: "Pretty obviously, this is a sign that the economy is still in bad shape, especially at the lower income ends. Wall Street may still be giving bonuses, but more and more Americans don't have places to live or food to eat" ... Nestle added that funding for this level of food stamp use could prove unsustainable in the current economy. "Some funding has already been cannibalized to fund the Child Nutrition Reauthorization," she said. "The more expensive it gets, the more the program will be a target for lawmakers looking for moveable cash."

With an estimated one-eighth of the population on food stamps each month, and no improvement to the economy in sight, it seems like there is plenty to worry about.


This post also appears on foodpolitics.com.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Marion Nestle is a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is the author of Food Politics, Safe Food, What to Eat, and Pet Food Politics. More

Nestle also holds appointments as Professor of Sociology at NYU and Visiting Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell. She is the author of three prize-winning books: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (revised edition, 2007), Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety (2003), and What to Eat (2006). Her most recent book is Feed Your Pet Right: The Authoritative Guide to Feeding Your Dog and Cat. She writes the Food Matters column for The San Francisco Chronicle and blogs almost daily at Food Politics.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

From This Author

Just In