Welcome, EatingWell, and Not a Moment Too Soon

More
choctart1_post.jpg

EatingWell.com


I'm very glad that a partnership we've been working on for a long time—recipes from EatingWell magazine and EatingWell.com, one of the best-run and most useful cooking sites I know, on the Food Channel, and some of our pieces on theirs—has come to fruition just in time for the weeks when a lot of us get our kitchens into high gear, and for the next six weeks food will be on our minds, and in our refrigerators and pantries, in greater excess, I mean abundance, than any other time of year.

I'm already adapting EatingWell's sweet potato recipe, to accede to my stepdaughter's wish, a.k.a. command, that we include marshmallows.

So ideas from EatingWell come just in time to save you from the worst of the regret and remorse that will drive people en masse to its site on January 2. Its recipes are not just sensible but good, in a very unfussy and doable way that has been the hallmark of the magazine since it began, in beautiful Charlotte, Vermont, down the road from Shelburne Farms.

I was the magazine's first restaurant critic, and many of the most significant friendships I formed during my years getting to travel around the country looking for local- and sustainability-minded chefs, then very unfashionable and very very much in the minority, have stayed with me to this day. As have my deep admiration for our very own Barry Estabrook and the incomparable editor Rux Martin, who brought me there in the first place.

Today EatingWell is in the very capable hands of Lisa Gosselin, and she's brought it with full force into the internet era, with the kind of smart, simple, but not dumbed-down recipes you can find on last week's Thanksgiving side slide show, and today's collection of dessert recipes—two of the meal categories that annually bedevil cooks.

Including us. Yesterday my spouse and I ventured into Whole Foods for just the preliminary list for the dinner we're hosting on Friday, and it was the predictable crush. We went with guidance from Regina Charboneau, whose series last year and this will give you sensible, calming, and original advice for feeding a crowd this week. Particularly if you've got to provide the turkey, too. It's usually one or the other, and for us this year it's sides and desserts.

As always, recipes are blueprints you use as suit you—and I'm already adapting EatingWell's on sweet potatoes, to accede to my stepdaughter's wish, a.k.a. command, that we include marshmallows. They're organic and gluten-free, of course. And the potatoes come from two farms, both as it happens remnants from farm shares that my sister and another friend kindly dropped off. And at Whole Foods we of course turned out backs on the Californian cauliflower and Brussels sprouts—the Jamaica Plain farmers' market has its last rally tomorrow afternoon! And it goes out with a particular burst of glory, with warmly saffron-colored heads of cauliflower and the sculptural Romanesco cauliflower I might subject my family to looking at in the middle of the table along with the sugar pumpkins, and of course eating.

More from all of us as the countdown continues this week—time to draw up another marketing list! And go straight to our happy new EatingWell collections to draw up yours.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." More

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." Julia Child once said, "I think he's a very good food writer. He really does his homework. As a reporter and a writer he takes his work very seriously." Kummer's 1990 Atlantic series about coffee was heralded by foodies and the general public alike. The response to his recommendations about coffees and coffee-makers was typical--suppliers scrambled to meet the demand. As Giorgio Deluca, co-founder of New York's epicurean grocery Dean & Deluca, says: "I can tell when Corby's pieces hit; the phone doesn't stop ringing." His book, The Joy of Coffee, based on his Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." In nominating his work for a National Magazine Award (for which he became a finalist), the editors wrote: "Kummer treats food as if its preparation were something of a life sport: an activity to be pursued regularly and healthfully by knowledgeable people who demand quality." Kummer's book The Pleasures of Slow Food celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995 and 1996 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He is also a frequent food commentator on television and radio. He was educated at Yale, immediately after which he came to The Atlantic. He is the recipient of five James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

From This Author

Just In