Recipe: Roasted Delicata Squash With Quinoa Salad

This recipe, by chef Michael Symon, is adapted from Food & Wine's Reinventing the Classics.

    • 2 Delicata squash (about 1 pound each), halved lengthwise and seeded
    • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil salt and freshly ground pepper
    • 1 cup quinoa
    • 2 tablespoons golden raisins
    • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
    • 1 teaspoon honey
    • 1 Granny Smith apple, finely diced
    • 1 large shallot, minced
    • 1 garlic clove, minced
    • 2 tablespoons chopped mint
    • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
    • 2 ounces arugula (2 cups)

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Brush the cut sides of the squash with one teaspoon of the olive oil and season the cavities with salt and pepper. Place the squash cut side down on a baking sheet and roast for about 45 minutes, until tender.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, bring two cups of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the quinoa, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the raisins and simmer, covered, until the water is absorbed, about five minutes. Transfer the quinoa to a large bowl and let cool.

In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar and honey with the remaining one tablespoon plus two teaspoons of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add the dressing to the quinoa along with the apple, shallot, garlic, mint and parsley and toss well. Add the arugula and toss gently.

Set the squash halves on plates. Fill with the salad and serve.

Make-ahead:

The quinoa can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature and add the arugula just before serving.

To read the first part of Regina's series about reinventing classing Thanksgiving foods, click here.

Presented by

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

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