Recipe: Regina's Acorn Squash and Roasted Pecan Popovers

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Popover batter:

    • 4 medium eggs or 3 large eggs
    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 1 cup milk
    • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Filling:

    • 1 cup roasted squash
    • ½ cup roasted pecans

For the roasted squash:

    • 1 cup roasted acorn squash (1 acorn squash typically yields 1 cup of roasted squash)
    • 1 teaspoon olive oil
    • 1 teaspoon crushed garlic
    • ¼ teaspoon fresh thyme
    • ¼ teaspoon salt
    • ½ teaspoon cracked black pepper

To make the roasted squash, cut squash in half, drizzle oil, and add seasonings. Bake at 400 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool slightly and scoop roasted squash out of skin out with a spoon.

For the roasted pecans:

    • ½ cup pecan halves
    • 1 tablespoon butter
    • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    • 2 dashes Louisiana hot sauce
    • ½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
    • ½ teaspoon salt

Place all of the ingredients in a small cast-iron skillet and bake at 250 degrees for 20 minutes, stirring every eight to 10 minutes.

The final recipe:

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Grease six 6-ounce custard cups. In a medium bowl beat eggs with a wire whisk for 45 to 60 seconds—no need to over-whip. Beat in flour, milk, and salt until smooth. Be careful not to over-beat.

Fill custard cups a quarter full with batter. Add squash to the center of each, then add chopped pecans. Evenly distribute remaining batter. Do not fill too high because they will rise quite a bit.

Bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Then decrease oven temperature to 350 degrees and bake for 20 minutes more. Immediately remove from cups and serve piping hot.

* If you would like to make these sweet instead of savory, eliminate the spice on the squash and pecans and replace with a quarter cup of brown sugar and a teaspoon of cinnamon, then roast just the same. Roast the pecans with one tablespoon butter, two tablespoons powdered sugar, and a quarter teaspoon of cinnamon. It works just as well and is totally different if you would like a different brunch item. I like to dust the sweet popovers with powdered cinnamon sugar and drizzle with maple syrup.

To read the first part of Regina's series about reinventing classing Thanksgiving foods, click here.

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Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.
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