Recipe: Bob Blumer's Turkey Parfait

If cranberries with figs are jazz, this recipe may seem punk rock to you. I think it never hurts for us to break out of our food comfort zone.

Yields 2 servings

    • 1 cup (250 ml) leftover turkey, torn or cut in small pieces
    • 2/3 cup (160 ml) leftover mashed potatoes
    • 2/3 cup (160 ml) leftover squash
    • 2/3 cup (160 ml) leftover greens
    • 2 leftover roasted Brussels sprouts
    • 1/2 cup (125 ml) cranberry sauce
    • 2 parfait glasses or similar facsimiles

Reheat turkey, potatoes, squash, greens, and Brussels sprouts in an oven or microwave.

To assemble the parfait, use a spoon to layer the turkey, squash, greens, and cranberry sauce in individual parfait glasses. Finish with an ice-cream scoop of mashed potatoes, and top with a roasted Brussels Sprout.

As for the level of difficulty, it's as easy as assembling an ice-cream parfait. Active prep time takes about 10 minutes. One possible shortcut: If you have a microwave oven, assemble the parfait whole to begin with, then microwave it all at once.

Music to cook by: Arlo Guthrie, Alice's Restaurant. (Pray that your turkey dinner doesn't suffer the same fate.)

Liquid Assets: Any wine left over from the previous night's turkey dinner.

To read Regina's article about reinventing Thanksgiving—including turkey—click here.

Presented by

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

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