Recipe: Quince Braised in Honey and Wine

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Adapted from Deborah Madison's Seasonal Fruit Desserts: From Orchard, Farm and Market.

Serves 4 to 6

    • 4 to 6 ripe, fragrant quince (about 2 pounds)
    • 2 cinnamon sticks
    • 1/2 cup honey
    • 1/2 cup dessert wine, such as Quady Essensia Orange Muscat or Navarro late-harvest Riesling
    • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 400 F. Select a wide, shallow baking dish that will comfortably hold the quince in a single layer with some doubling up if need be. Rub the fuzz off each quince, rinse, then slice crosswise into rounds about 1/2 inch thick or even a little thicker, leaving the skins on.

Arrange the rounds of fruit in the baking dish. Tuck in the cinnamon sticks, drizzle over the honey, pour in the honey, then dot with the butter. Cover the dish with foil. Bake for 25 minutes, then remove the foil and bake for 20 minutes more. Turn the slices over and slosh the juices around, then return the dish to the oven and bake until burnished and tender when pierced with a paring knife, another 15 to 30 minutes. In the end the juices will have cooked down to a dark syrup.

Serve warm or at room temperature, alone or with something creamy; spoon the syrup over the fruit.

To read Aglaia's review of Deborah Madison's Seasonal Fruit Desserts, click here.

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Aglaia Kremezi writes about food in Greek, European, and American magazines, publishes books about Mediterranean cooking in the U.S. and Greece, and teaches cooking classes. More

Aglaia Kremezi has changed her life and her profession many times over. She currently writes about food in Greek, European and American magazines, publishes books about Greek and Mediterranean cooking in the US and in Greece, and teaches cooking to small groups of travelers who visit Kea. Before that she was a journalist and editor, writing about everything, except politics. She has been the editor in chief and the creator of news, women's, and life-style magazines, her last disastrous venture being a "TV guide for thinking people," a contradiction in terms, at least in her country. She studied art, graphic design, and photography at the Polytechnic of Central London. For five years she taught photography to graphic designers while freelancing as a news and fashion photographer for Athenian magazines and newspapers. Editors liked her extended captions more than the pieces the journalists submitted for the events she took pictures for, so she was encouraged to do her own stories, gradually becoming a full time journalist and editor. You can visit her website at www.keartisanal.com.


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