Feds Demand Info About Foods Marketed to Kids

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Okay, so "begging" isn't quite the right word. The FTC (Federal Trade Commission) has issued subpoenas to 48 food companies demanding information about their marketing practices aimed at children.

The FTC tried this once before and issued a report in 2008 based on the information it received. But companies were not exactly forthcoming with the data. In the present political climate, they will foot-drag this time too.

According to ThePacker.com, the FTC is asking for asked for nutritional data on the companies' products as well as marketing information by December 1.

The FTC is quoted as saying that none of this is expected to lead to new regulations. I guess the FTC is trying to do what it can under challenging circumstances.

But let me ask again: Where is the FTC's long-awaited report on nutrition standards for marketing products to kids? If it can't even get that report out, can the new subpoenas do any good?


This post also appears on foodpolitics.com.

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Marion Nestle is a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is the author of Food Politics, Safe Food, What to Eat, and Pet Food Politics. More

Nestle also holds appointments as Professor of Sociology at NYU and Visiting Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell. She is the author of three prize-winning books: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (revised edition, 2007), Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety (2003), and What to Eat (2006). Her most recent book is Feed Your Pet Right: The Authoritative Guide to Feeding Your Dog and Cat. She writes the Food Matters column for The San Francisco Chronicle and blogs almost daily at Food Politics.

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