Michelle Obama's Child Nutrition Op-Ed

Actions might speak louder than words, but it's still nice to have words—and Michelle Obama's op-ed in today's Washington Post, which complements her array of anti-obesity initiatives, is an especially noteworthy collection of them. She writes that although the Let's Move program is helping parents keep kids healthy, we still need to ensure that schools can keep them healthy too. Hence the need for Congress to pass the pending Child Nutrition Bill, which Obama calls "groundbreaking legislation" that "will bring fundamental change to schools and improve the food options available to our children":

To start, the bill will make it easier for the tens of millions of children who participate in the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program -- and many others who are eligible but not enrolled -- to get the nutritious meals they need to do their best. It will set higher nutritional standards for school meals by requiring more fruits, vegetables and whole grains while reducing fat and salt. It will offer rewards to schools that meet those standards. And it will help eliminate junk food from vending machines and a la carte lines -- a major step that is supported by parents, health-experts, and many in the food and beverage industry....

That's why it is so important that Congress pass this bill as soon as possible. We owe it to the children who aren't reaching their potential because they're not getting the nutrition they need during the day. We owe it to the parents who are working to keep their families healthy and looking for a little support along the way. We owe it to the schools that are trying to make progress but don't have the resources they need. And we owe it to our country -- because our prosperity depends on the health and vitality of the next generation.

Read the full story at The Washington Post.

Presented by

Daniel Fromson, a former associate editor at The Atlantic, is a writer based in Washington, D.C. He writes regularly for The Washington Post. His work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, New York, and Slate.

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