Junk Food Crackdown: Feds to Boost Regulation?

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Has child nutrition reform finally gathered momentum? Several weeks ago, Marion Nestle, writing on the Atlantic Food Channel, wondered whether the Federal Trade Commission was getting serious about nutrition labeling when it scolded Kellogg for placing misleading health claims on its cereals. Now it appears she was right. Here's BNET on how the FTC is teaming up with other agencies to push for unprecedented standards for foods marketed to children:

A document created by an interagency working group (PDF link) consisting of officials from the FTC, the FDA, the CDC and the USDA lays out the federal government's current thinking on nutritional standards for foods that are marketed to kids aged 2-17.

And unlike some of the industry's previous attempts at self-generated health standards, the government's criteria are strict. No Froot Loop loopholes here. Products marketed to children would have to meet both a food standard, which means they have to have a certain amount of actual food in them, and a nutrient standard, which sets limits on how much bad stuff they can contain.

Read the full story at BNET.

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Daniel Fromson, a former associate editor at The Atlantic, is a writer based in Washington, D.C. He writes regularly for The Washington Post. His work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, New York, and Slate.

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