Classic and Classy: Peanut Butter Cups at Home

More
Schneider_peanutbuttercups_7-22_post.jpg

Tara Mann


After 10:00 pm, I am driven by a sweet-tooth so fierce that I never keep actual sweets like ice cream or cookies on hand; I'm afraid of what would happen. Then I find myself foraging through the cupboard, looking for something that will satisfy my craving.

When I stumbled on the milk chocolate disks I usually use for dessert-making, I had a vision: peanut butter cups. Chunky organic peanut butter sandwiched between really good chocolate ... instant and brilliant to my mind. I tried out the idea with both Valrhona chocolate and Guittard (which has a more overtly peanut-butter-cup shape) in a side-by-side tasting to discover how much better Valrhona really is: more deeply flavored, creamier, stunningly good.

Then I swapped out the peanut butter for some Hazelnut Praline I had in the fridge and found myself savoring the taste of gianduja—chocolate with roasted hazelnut—that made me think of a wild truffle-hunting trip to Piemonte, Italy, where they love the stuff. I'd once hauled back kilos of gianduiotti, the little foil-wrapped candy shaped like an upturned boat, from Turin, and parceled them out until they were, finally, gone.

This improvised two-ingredient midnight snack will deeply feed a crazy hunger. (The picture is the recipe ... ) Valrhona milk chocolate "feves" are available at Whole Foods Markets, or by mail-order here.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Sally Schneider writes The Improvised Life, a lifestyle blog about improvising as a daily practice. Her cookbook The Improvisational Cook is now out in paperback. More

Sally Schneider is the founder of The Improvised Life, a lifestyle blog that inspires you to devise, invent, create, make it up as you go along, from design and cooking to cultivating the creative spirit. It's been called a "zeitgeist-perfect website." She is a regular contributor to public radio's The Splendid Table and the author of the best-selling cookbooks The Improvisational Cook and A New Way to Cook, which was recently named one of the best books of the decade by The Guardian. She has won numerous awards, including four James Beard awards, for her books and magazine writing.

Sally has worked as a journalist, editor, stylist, lecturer, restaurant chef, teacher, and small-space consultant, and once wrangled 600 live snails for the photographer Irving Penn. Her varied work has been the laboratory for the themes she writes and lectures about: improvising as an essential operating principle; cultivating resourcefulness and your inner artist; design, style, and food; and anything that is cost-effective, resourceful, and outside the box.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Why Did I Study Physics?

In this hand-drawn animation, a college graduate explains why she chose her major—and what it taught her about herself.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Video

What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

Video

Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

Video

How Is Social Media Changing Journalism?

How new platforms are transforming radio, TV, print, and digital

Video

The Place Where Silent Movies Sing

How an antique, wind-powered pipe organ brings films to life

Feature

The Future of Iced Coffee

Are artisan businesses like Blue Bottle doomed to fail when they go mainstream?

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

From This Author

Just In