Recipe: Shigefumi Tachibe's Tuna Tartare

Shigefumi Tachibe, credited with inventing tuna tartare, added the dish to his menu as a way to educate his Beverly Hills clientele about sushi through the more familiar European dish. His version combines Japanese ingredients with French technique, featuring a mayonnaise sauce reminiscent of the one used in the beef version.

Makes 4 servings

    • 1 pound tuna (Ahi if possible)
    • 1/2 avocado, sliced
    • 12 slices Melba toast or toasted sliced baguette
    • 2 egg yolks
    • 5 ounces olive oil
    • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped sweet pickles
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
    • 1 teaspoon finely chopped capers
    • 1 pinch minced tarragon
    • 1 tablespoon crushed green peppercorns
    • juice of 1/4 lemon

Cut tuna into quarter-inch dice.

Slowly whisk olive oil and Dijon mustard into the egg yolks to make a creamy mayonnaise.

Mix the tarragon and chives with the chopped vegetables and other seasonings, then add lemon juice. Sprinkle salt and black pepper on top.

Mix the tuna with the vegetable/seasoning mixture and spread on Melba toasts or sliced toasted baguette. Top with thin slices of avocado.

To read Katie's story about how Chef Tachibe invented this iconic dish, click here.

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Katie Robbins is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles. She has covered food, culture, and lifestyle for a variety of publications, including Psychology Today, Saveur, Meatpaper, Tablet, and BlackBook, among others. More

Katie Robbins is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles. She has covered food, culture, and lifestyle for a variety of publications, including Psychology Today, Saveur, Meatpaper, Tablet, and BlackBook, among others.

In her former life as a documentary producer, she reported on issues such as the New Orleans school system, America's health insurance crisis, and the U.S. Secret Service for organizations like PBS NewsHour, ABC News, and the National Geographic Channel. Learn more at www.katiesallierobbins.com.

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