Recipe: Spring Pea Soup

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You can top this soup with mint or crabmeat with sherry. I just love the freshness and color of this soup for a spring menu.

Serves 8

For the soup:
    • 2 tablespoons butter
    • 1 cup cleaned, diced leek (the white part only)
    • 1 clove of garlic, peeled and cut in half
    • 4 cups vegetable stock (make from the pods, with carrot and onion)
    • 2 cups fresh peas
    • 1 teaspoon pink sea salt or any sea salt
    • 2 teaspoons julienned fresh mint
    • 1 cups heavy cream

For the crab topping:
    • 4 tablespoons butter
    • 1 pound lump crabmeat
    • ¼ cup cream sherry

Make the soup:
In a medium-sized skillet, add butter and sauté diced leeks for five minutes. Add garlic and sauté three to five minutes more.

In four-quart soup pot add vegetable stock and fresh peas. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes.

Remove a half-cup of peas (these are to be added back after the soup is pureed). Add the leeks and continue to cook for 30 minutes.

Add salt and puree in blender, or use hand blender to puree. Add cream and continue to cook for 15 more minutes, add julienned mint, and turn the heat off.

Make the crab topping:
In separate sauté pan, slowly melt butter, add the sherry, and reduce for five minutes. Add the lump crabmeat.

Pour soup into individual soup bowls and top with sautéed lump crabmeat.

To read Regina's post about peas and the tastes (and prejudices) of youth, click here.

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Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.
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