More NFL Winemakers

Drew.jpg

Not long ago, I went to dinner with former NFL coach Dick Vermeil to sample his new wines--Vermeil has established a post-football career as a wine maker in Napa Valley. (His wines are excellent, by the way.) Turns out Vermeil is not the only NFL veteran to become a wine maker. As my part-time employer The Boston Globe reports today, former slow-footed Patriots quarterback Drew Bledsoe is also making wine is his native Washington:

Bledsoe is back in Massachusetts this week for the first time in several years to promote the inaugural vintage of his Doubleback winery cabernet sauvignon. ..

He is off to a good start. Famed critic Robert Parker of The Wine Advocate gave Doubleback a rating of 91-94, which is "outstanding'' on the newsletter's scale. Ever the competitor, Bledsoe said somewhat under his breath that his group believes the rating was a bit low.

Maybe I can persuade the Atlantic's Food Channel to host an NFL wine tasting.

(Aside for Boston sports fans: think David Ortiz could be convinced to go into the wine-making business, like, now?)


Presented by

Joshua Green is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Health

Just In