Recipe: Mississippi Hushpuppies

Here is my basic recipe for the treasured Southern dish. You can add what you like (when no one is looking).

    • 1½ cups self-rising cornmeal (yellow or white)
    • ½ cup self-rising flour
    • ½ teaspoon baking soda
    • ¾ teaspoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon of granulated garlic powder
    • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
    • ½ cup (about 1 small) chopped green onion, including the white bottom
    • ½ to ¾ cup buttermilk
    • 1 egg, lightly beaten

Using an electric fryer, preheat oil to 350 F.

In a mixing bowl, stir together the cornmeal, flour, baking soda, and salt, garlic powder, and cayenne. Stir in the green onion. (If you are adding other ingredients like bacon, crawfish or smoked fish, this is where you add them.)

In a small bowl, stir together half a cup of the buttermilk and egg. Pour the buttermilk mixture into the dry ingredients and mix until blended. You want the mixture to be stiff enough to roll into a one-inch ball. If the mixture seems too dry add a touch more buttermilk.

Fry until golden brown, turning the hushpuppies during the cooking process.

To read Regina's account of the hushpuppy's history, click here.

Presented by

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Health

From This Author

Just In