Recipe: Green Chickpeas, Edamame-Style

Spring is green chickpea season—they can be found at some ethnic and farmer's markets, and frozen, already shucked, in some supermarkets. Fresh chickpeas look like a cross between a fat, blunted pea and a soybean in its shell (also called edamame).

    • fresh chickpeas
    • flaky sea salt

Place a steamer basket in a pot that just fits and add about an inch of water. Bring to a boil over high heat and add as the chickpeas. Steam for three minutes, testing a chickpea for tenderness every minute or two until they are tender but still slightly crunchy.

Transfer to a bowl and toss with sea salt. When cool enough to handle, shuck and eat the chickpeas one pod at a time.

To read Sally's article about coming upon fresh chickpeas in her local market—and how she cooked them—click here.

[Curator's Note: For another recipe that uses green chickpeas, try our very own Hank Shaw's take on ciciones (Sardinian semolina gnocchi).]

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Sally Schneider writes The Improvised Life, a lifestyle blog about improvising as a daily practice. Her cookbook The Improvisational Cook is now out in paperback. More

Sally Schneider is the founder of The Improvised Life, a lifestyle blog that inspires you to devise, invent, create, make it up as you go along, from design and cooking to cultivating the creative spirit. It's been called a "zeitgeist-perfect website." She is a regular contributor to public radio's The Splendid Table and the author of the best-selling cookbooks The Improvisational Cook and A New Way to Cook, which was recently named one of the best books of the decade by The Guardian. She has won numerous awards, including four James Beard awards, for her books and magazine writing.

Sally has worked as a journalist, editor, stylist, lecturer, restaurant chef, teacher, and small-space consultant, and once wrangled 600 live snails for the photographer Irving Penn. Her varied work has been the laboratory for the themes she writes and lectures about: improvising as an essential operating principle; cultivating resourcefulness and your inner artist; design, style, and food; and anything that is cost-effective, resourceful, and outside the box.

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