An Italian Salad for the Post-Passover Pantry

More
willinger_matzohnella_4-7_post.jpg

oskay/flickr


Zeke's post made me think about "matzoh-nella," my Tuscan matzoh riff. A few years ago I was gifted a few boxes of matzoh, left over from a community Seder. I thought about making matzoh brei but decided my Florentine husband needed something a little more familiar for his first matzoh encounter. So I substituted soaked and squeezed matzoh for bread in panzanella, a traditional Tuscan first-course salad made with stale bread.

He was impressed. I loved the name, which sounds so Italian. Note: I still had plenty of leftover matzoh. I think it multiplies in the box.

Serves 4 to 6 as a first course

    • 4 ounces matzoh
    • 1 red onion, coarsely chopped
    • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
    • around 1 cup cherry tomatoes
    • 1 cucumber
    • 1 bunch rucola (rocket) or purslane, cut into bite-sized pieces
    • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped basil
    • 3 to 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • fine sea salt
    • freshly ground black pepper

Soak matzoh in a bowl of water for 10 minutes until soft. Squeeze all the water out of the matzoh and measure 2 cups. Place the damp matzoh in a large serving bowl and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Split the cucumber in half lengthwise, remove the seeds (I use the tip of a potato peeler), cut into chunks, season with salt, and set aside for 10 minutes.

Marinate the onions with the vinegar for 10 minutes.

Cut cherry tomatoes in half and squeeze over a sieve to eliminate seeds and juice.

Drain the cucumber chunks and combine with onion, tomatoes, rucola, basil, and matzoh. Dress with the extra virgin olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Faith Willinger is a chef, author, and born-again Italian. She moved to Italy in 1973 and has spent over 30 years searching for the best food from the Alps to Sicily. More

Faith Heller Willinger is a born-again Italian. She moved to Italy in 1973 and was seduced by Italian regional cooking. Faith has spent more than 30 years searching for the best food and wine, as well as the world beyond the table from the Alps to Sicily. She has no regrets about mileage or calories. Faith was awarded the prestigious San Pellegrino award for outstanding work as an ambassador of Italian cooking. She lives full-time in Florence with her Tuscan husband, Massimo. Her son Max lives in Milan. She's the author of the bestselling (9th printing) guidebook Eating in Italy, the cookbook Red, White & Greens, and the narrative recipe book Adventures of an Italian Food Lover. Faith teaches in her kitchen in Florence on Wednesdays, supplied with freshly picked produce from her favorite farmers. Check out her web site at www.faithwillinger.com.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

A Fascinating Short Film About the Multiverse

If life is a series of infinite possibilities, what does it mean to be alive?


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Death of Film

You'll never hear the whirring sound of a projector again.

Video

How to Hunt With Poison Darts

A Borneo hunter explains one of his tribe's oldest customs: the art of the blowpipe

Video

A Delightful, Pixar-Inspired Cartoon

An action figure and his reluctant sidekick trek across a kitchen in search of treasure.

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

From This Author

Just In