SLIDE SHOW: The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World

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Juan Alcón


Escabeche brings together the most basic and essential ingredients of the Spanish kitchen: olive oil, white wine, laurel, whole peppercorns, onion, garlic, and vinegar.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


I personally prefer escabeche smothered in a generous mound of julienned onions. Other cooks may use less.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


The onions should be sweetish yellow ones, frequently sold in the U.S. as "Spanish onions." Here in Spain they're pretty much the only onions available.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


A good olive oil is the base of nearly all Spanish dishes, and can be used with generosity. For cooking do not use extra-virgin: the taste overpowers the other ingredients.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


The browned meat (I used rather inelegant chicken: a poor-man's city escabeche, but more traditionally this dish would be made with partridge or rabbit) is piled into the pot, then buried in onions. For this dish I use a large clay pot, but an ordinary metal one would work fine.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


We can now pour equal parts of wine and vinegar over all the other ingredients heaped into the pot, and cover the pot to cook slowly.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


After about an hour of slow cooking, the onions have practically melted and the liquid has become a rich sour sauce. You may want to remove the lid and let it cook down a little bit more.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Juan Alcón


The escabeche can be served immediately as a hot dish, although it improves significantly after a day or two in the refrigerator. I usually make a large quantity in order to serve some immediately and save some for later.


Maggie Schmitt describes the history of escabeche, a dish that spans three continents in
The Vinegared Dish Found 'Round the World.

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Maggie Schmitt is a freelance researcher and translator based in Madrid.  She is currently working on a book called The Gaza Kitchen with Laila El-Haddad. Learn more at gazakitchens.wordpress.com.

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