Recipe: Potato and Onion Frittata with Rosemary

Adapted from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone , this frittata is made from start to finish in a cast-iron pan.

Serves 2
 

    • scant 1 3 cup olive oil (fruity Spanish olive oil is best here, but not necessary)
    • about 1 ½ pounds potatoes (any type), or as many as you have on hand that will fit into your pan, peeled and very thinly sliced
    • 1 medium onion, peeled and sliced
    • 5 eggs, beaten
    • salt and pepper
    • about 2 teaspoons rosemary, minced

Generously film an eight-inch cast-iron skillet with olive oil. *Note: if you don't have cast iron, you can use a non-stick skillet; you will just have to flip the frittata later in order to cook both sides, rather than putting it in the oven to cook. And if you don't have a pan of this size, you can use a larger pan and add more eggs and potatoes.

Add the onions and cook, stirring, until they have stared to color. Now add the potatoes and rosemary and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until they are golden and the onions have browned.

Transfer the onions, potatoes, and rosemary to a bowl. Wipe out the pan, add more olive oil, and turn the heat to low. Turn your broiler on, or just heat the oven to a high temperature (around 450 or so) and move the oven rack to the top third of the oven.

Pour the eggs over the potato and onion mixture, then pour the whole thing into the pan. Smooth down any potatoes that stick up, then cook over low heat. When you see the edges of the frittata starting to firm up and the center becoming opaque, test with a fork to see if the egg is cooked. (You want something slightly firm and spongy rather than wet and raw.)
 
When the bottom of the frittata seems cooked, place it under the broiler or in the oven to cook the top. Keep a careful eye on it so that it doesn't burn; when it's puffy and golden on top, it's done. *If you don't have an oven-proof pan: invert the frittata onto a plate, then slide it back into the pan so that the cooked side is on top, and cook for a few minutes. This is the proper way to cook a frittata, but I find the flipping a little nerve-wracking, and the oven method has always served me well.

To read Anastatia Curley's post about vanquishing old potatoes with this frittata recipe, click here .

Presented by

Anastatia Curley is the former Communications Coordinator of the Yale Sustainable Food Project. More

Anastatia Curley is the former Communications Coordinator of the Yale Sustainable Food Project. She now lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she writes, cooks, and caters local and sustainable meals.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Health

Just In