Recipe: Noon-e Gurdui (Persian Walnut Cookies)

During the Iranian New Year tradition, each family lays out foods to bring various blessings for the coming year. Sweets are part of the "seven S's," and symbolize hospitality.

    • 1 ½ cups walnuts, finely ground
    • 3 egg yolks
    • 1 egg white
    • ¾ cup sugar
    • 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 tablespoon rose water (optional)
    • ½ cup pistachio slivers
    • butter for greasing baking sheets

Preheat the oven to 350F.

Mix sugar, baking powder and cardamom. In a separate bowl, beat egg yolks until pale in color, gradually adding the sugar mixture and rose water, if desired. Then stir in ground walnuts. Roll this dough into dime-sized balls and place on well-greased baking pans.

Beat the egg white slightly, adding a spoonful of water. Lightly press one pistachio sliver on top of each cookie, glazing with egg white.

Bake for 20 minutes or until golden. Though soft at first, cookies will harden when cooled.

To read more about the Iranian New Year and the traditions surrounding its holiday foods, click here.

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Maggie Schmitt is a freelance researcher and translator based in Madrid.  She is currently working on a book called The Gaza Kitchen with Laila El-Haddad. Learn more at gazakitchens.wordpress.com.

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