Recipe: Kosher Roast Chicken with Rosemary-Lemon Stuffing

This chicken is a thing of beauty and culinary prowess. Chef Daniel Humm serves it as his four-star restaurant Eleven Madison Park. When I ate it at the restaurant, I was sure he made the dish using high-end culinary techniques that couldn't be replicated at home. How wrong I was.

Serves 4

For the stuffing*:
    • 1 cup challah bread crumbs
    • ¼ cup olive oil
    • ½ stick margarine
    • 2 tablespoons rosemary, minced finely
    • zest of one lemon
    • salt and pepper

*For a non-kosher version of this dish, substitute one and a half cups of softened butter for the olive oil and margarine.

For the chicken:
    • 1 3 to 4 pound chicken
    • 3 garlic cloves
    • 1 whole lemon, pricked with a fork a few times

For the pan sauce:
    • chicken drippings
    • 10 ounces button mushrooms, cleaned and sliced into ¼-inch slices
    • two cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
    • one sprig of thyme
    • ¼ cup red wine
    • salt and pepper

Make the stuffing:
Combine all the ingredients for the stuffing, and season with salt and pepper. Preheat the oven to 375 F.

Prepare the chicken:
Season the bird inside and out, and stuff the cavity with garlic and lemon. Separate the skin of the chicken from the meat (don't tear it!) and use your hands (or a piping bag) to ease the stuffing under the skin. Pat it down and make sure there's approximately the same amount of stuffing on all parts of the breast and thigh.

Truss the chicken and put in the oven for 45 minutes, or until the juices run clear when sliced at the thigh. Let rest for 10 minutes, while making the pan sauce.

Make the pan sauce:
Pour the chicken drippings into a pan set over high heat. Add garlic and thyme, and sauté for 2 minutes being careful not to burn the garlic. Add mushrooms to cover one layer of the pan (you may have to sauté in batches.)

Once all mushrooms are seared and golden brown on both sides, add wine. Cook wine down until you can barely see it, taste for seasoning, remove garlic and thyme, and serve immediately over the chicken.

To read Sophie Brickman's post about the challenges of making four-star roast chicken in a kosher kitchen, click here.

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Sophie Brickman is a writer living and cooking in New York City. More

Sophie Brickman is a writer living and cooking in New York City. She is a graduate of Harvard College and the French Culinary Institute.

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