Recipe: Lamb Tagine With Prunes, Olives, and Raisins

More

This tagine is a spin-off of a chicken dish found in one of the Silver Palate cookbooks. While the original was not thought of as a masterpiece, its prunes, olives, and capers were enough to inspire the author to greater things.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

    • 2 pounds boneless lamb stew meat (shoulder works well), cut into 1" cubes
    • 3 teaspoon ras-el-hanout (Moroccan spice mix) or 1 teaspoon each of ground cumin, ground paprika, ginger, and cinnamon
    • 2 teaspoons hot chili flakes
    • 1 onion, roughly chopped
    • 1 large carrot, roughly chopped
    • 3 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 3 saffron threads
    • 2 ½ cups beef stock, chicken stock, or water
    • ¾ cup raisins
    • ¾ cup prunes, chopped
    • ½ cup pitted olives (I like to use black olives but not from a jar, if at all possible, as I find them completely lacking in flavor)
    • ¼ cup blanched almonds, roughly chopped
    • ¼ cup honey
    • salt and pepper
    • olive oil

In a bowl, combine lamb and spices, tossing to coat. In a Dutch oven, heat olive oil and brown lamb, in batches. Transfer the meat, with a slotted spoon, to a plate and put aside.

Add onion, carrot, and garlic to Dutch oven and sweat out until onion is translucent. Add lamb, saffron, and cinnamon, and cover with stock/water. Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer and cover, cooking approximately one and a half hours, or until the lamb is tender. For the last half hour of cooking, add raisins, prunes, olives, honey, and almonds.

Once lamb is tender, uncover and cook over high heat, stirring until the sauce cooks down and coats back of a spoon, approximately 15 minutes. Serve over couscous or with a piece of crusty bread, and Easy Peasy Tzatziki.

Note: You can prepare the tagine up to one day in advance and keep it in your fridge.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Sophie Brickman is a writer living and cooking in New York City. More

Sophie Brickman is a writer living and cooking in New York City. She is a graduate of Harvard College and the French Culinary Institute.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

Just In