Recipe: Riso e Zucca

Pumpkin_risotto_post.jpg

Photo by Simon Aughton/Flickr CC


Adapted from Celebrating Italy by Carol Field. I skip the butter or only use 2 TBS (it really doesn't change the flavor, but it makes it much healthier).

Make 6 servings

    • 1 lb. uncooked pumpkin or butternut squash
    • 3/4 cup minus 1 tbsp. Arborio rice
    • 2 cups chicken broth
    • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter (optional)
    • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    • Salt and pepper to taste

Cut the pumpkin or squash ino thick slices and cook in boiling, salted water until a knife pierces the flesh easily (about 5 minutes). Drain, peel, and cut into small dice.

Put the rice, diced squash, and chicken broth in a pan. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook over medium-low heat until the rice has absorbed all the broth, about 15 minutes.

Remove from the heat, stir in the butter (if you are using it) and cheese, and serve immediately.

Presented by

Alison E. Field

Alison E. Field is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and an Associate Professor in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. She researches the causes and consequences of weight gain, obesity, weight cycling, and eating disorders in children, adolescents, and adult women. She has been widely published in medical journals, including Pediatrics, Obesity, Archives of Internal Medicine, and has discussed her research on CNN, Fox, and local news affiliates.

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