Recipe: Pumpkin Ravioli with Browned Butter Ginger Sauce

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Serves 4 to 6

Pasta Dough

    • 3 cups of flour
    • 3 large eggs
    • ½ tsp. salt
    • 1 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

Pumpkin Filling
    • 1 ¼ cups of roasted pumpkin puree (or 1 15 oz. can of pumpkin puree)
    • ½ teaspoon salt
    • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1 tablespoon chopped ginger
    • ½ tablespoon chopped garlic
    • ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
    • ¼ cup ricotta cheese
    • 1 egg

Browned Butter Ginger Sauce

    • 1 tbsp. sliced ginger
    • 4 tbsp. butter

Mix flour and salt together. Make a well in the center of the pasta and crack the eggs into the center. This is pasta, old school.

Beat the eggs in the center and gradually fold in the flour with your hands.

When the dough starts to come together, knead it for approx 8-12 minutes until it forms smooth ball. Let it rest for 30 minutes to an hour.

While the dough is resting, combine the ingredients for the pumpkin filling together in a bowl.

Pasta maker (or rolling pin) time. Roll out the dough, preferably into a large rectangle until it is thin enough that you can see your fingers through it. Lightly flour it as you're rolling it out to keep it from sticking.

Beat the egg to make an egg wash that will help the pasta stick to itself.

Take a teaspoon and lay down the filling on one half of the pasta sheet in an array. Brush the egg wash in the spaces on that half of the pasta and fold the top over. Push the dough down between the pumpkin hills to ensure that the pasta is sticking.

Take a pizza cutter or a cup or ravioli cutter and cut the ravioli into squares (or other shapes).

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the ravioli about 7-10 at a time. Fresh pasta should only take about 3 to 4 minutes to cook. Set aside finished ravioli in a strainer.

Brown the butter in a saucepan and add the sliced ginger. When the ginger browns, turn the heat off and coat the ravioli in the browned butter. Serve.

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Margaret Tung is a member of the Yale College class of 2010. More

Margaret Tung is a member of the Yale College class of 2010. She writes a column called "Natural Nibbles" for the Yale Sustainable Food Project's blog.
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