Recipe: Lemon Curd S'mores

The citrus-lover's answer to a campfire classic mimics a miniature lemon meringue pie.

Lemon Curd

Use lemon curd anywhere you'd normally use butter or jam—I particularly like it on warm biscuits. It makes a beautiful filling for layer cakes, and can be spooned into tart shells and topped with fresh berries.

Makes about two cups

    • 6 egg yolks
    • 34 cup sugar
    • Pinch of salt
    • 13 cup fresh lemon juice (from 3 or 4 lemons)
    • 2 tablespoons grated lemon zest
    • 1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut into 18-inch slices

Add 1 inch of water to a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer over low heat. In a medium metal bowl whisk the egg yolks, sugar, and salt for about 2 minutes until smooth. Whisk in the lemon juice and zest until combined.

Place the mixing bowl on top of saucepan (the bowl should be wide enough to fit on top of the saucepan, but shouldn't be touching the simmering water). Stir the mixture constantly with a rubber spatula, scraping the bottom and sides of the bowl as you stir, until it begins to thicken, and will coat the back of a spoon. (It will thicken further on chilling, so don't worry if it seems thin.) This will take approximately 7 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

Whisk in the butter, one slice at a time. Wait until each piece almost disappears before adding the next.

Optional: For a smoother lemon curd, push through a sieve to remove both lemon zest and any lumps that may have formed during heating.

Spoon into a clean glass container. Lay a piece of plastic wrap on the surface to prevent a skin from forming, and allow to cool. The lemon curd will keep, refrigerated, for 2 weeks or more.

S'mores

Makes 6

    • 6 Graham crackers, broken in half, or 12 thin ginger cookies
    • 6 large white marshmallows
    • 13 cup lemon curd (recipe below)

Place cracker halves or cookies on a plate and spread generously with lemon curd. Skewer marshmallows, one per skewer, and cook directly over fire or gas flame until toasted to desired doneness.

Using a fork, push one marshmallow onto a cracker half or cookie. Press second cracker half or cookie onto each hot marshmallow to form sandwich.

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Michele Humes lives in Brooklyn, NY, and writes about food and culture. More

Michele Humes was raised in Hong Kong and educated in Scotland. She now lives in Brooklyn, NY, where she writes about food and culture. Learn more at her Web site.

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