Recipe: DC Central Kitchen's House-Brined Pickles

Adapted from a recipe presented at a People's Garden "Chef in the Garden Workshop." For more recipes, including Afghani Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Kabobs and Roasted and Curried Butternut Squash Soup, click here.

    • Cut 6 lbs cucumbers into half-inch-thick slices. Place them in a large container.
    • Peel two heads of garlic and add the garlic cloves to the cucumbers, along with two bunches of fresh dill and 1 cup of dry dill.
    • In a second large container, mix 5 cups vinegar, 8 cups water, ¾ cup kosher salt, and ½ cup sugar until the salt and sugar dissolve. Pour this over the cucumbers.
    • Place the cucumbers in the refrigerator and stir every few days. Depending on how sour you like your pickles, they should be ready in one to two weeks and will keep for up to one month.

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Daniel Fromson, a former associate editor at The Atlantic, is a writer based in Washington, D.C. He writes regularly for The Washington Post. His work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, New York, and Slate.

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