Recipe: Baked Tomatoes Stuffed with Natchez Spinach

charboneau_tomatoes.jpg

Photo by Regina Charboneau


My creamed spinach recipe is so rich it's only legal to eat it twice a year, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Makes 12 servings

    • 6 Medium-sized tomatoes
    • 1/4 lb. Butter
    • 12 oz. Cream cheese
    • 1 cup Grated sharp cheddar
    • 1 tbls. Minced garlic
    • 1 tbls. Minced jalapeno
    • 2 lbs. Baby spinach leaves

With a small paring knife, cut each tomato in half by cutting into the center of each with alternating incisions: / then \ (this will create a star effect: /\/\/\/\ at the top of each tomato half). Then scoop out the center of each tomato half with a spoon. Place on baking sheet.

In sautee pan add 1 tbls. of the 1/4 lb. of butter and sautee the baby spinach leaves. Drain all the excess liquid.

In a saucepan, melt the rest of the butter, add the cream cheese, garlic, and jalapeno. Blend with a wooden spoon until smooth, then add the grated cheese and cooked spinach.

Spoon spinach mixture into each tomato half, and bake at 350 degrees F for 15-18 minutes.

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Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

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