San Francisco vs. Cocoa Krispies

nestle_sept29_krispies_post.jpg

Image Courtesy of Marion Nestle

Now that the Smart Choices program is on hold, it's time to take a look at what else is on food packages these days. My current favorite example is the huge IMMUNITY banner across Kellogg's Cocoa Krispies.

I don't know how you interpret this but my mind boggles at the very idea that eating Cocoa Krispies might protect kids against swine flu.

Apparently, the minds of the San Francisco attorney general's staff are equally boggled.  They just sent a warning letter to Kellogg's:

"Specifically, the Immunity Claims may falsely suggest to parents that cereals like Cocoa Krispies are more healthy for their children than other breakfast foods that are not high in sugar and not highly processed. The Immunity Claims may also mislead parents into believing that serving this sugary cereal will actually boost their child's immunity, leaving parents less likely to take more productive steps to protect their children's health."

The city attorneys are asking Kellogg's to provide copies of all of the consumer and scientific research the company used to establish this claim, or else. If they don't get these documents, they will "seek an immediate termination or modification of the advertising claim...."

Good idea. I can't wait to see how Kellogg's--ever at the leading edge of advertising claims--will respond.

But wait!  Shouldn't the FDA be taking this on?

Presented by

Marion Nestle is a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is the author of Food Politics, Safe Food, What to Eat, and Pet Food Politics. More

Nestle also holds appointments as Professor of Sociology at NYU and Visiting Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell. She is the author of three prize-winning books: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (revised edition, 2007), Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety (2003), and What to Eat (2006). Her most recent book is Feed Your Pet Right: The Authoritative Guide to Feeding Your Dog and Cat. She writes the Food Matters column for The San Francisco Chronicle and blogs almost daily at Food Politics.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Health

From This Author

Just In