Recipe: Spicy Pickled Green Tomatoes, Peppers, and Onions

kremezi_oct22_pickledtomatoes_post.jpg

Photo by Aglaia Kremezi

Hard green tomatoes are ideal for pickling.

    • 2-3 pounds firm green tomatoes, large or small
    • 1 large or 2 medium onions, quartered or cut into 8 pieces
    • 4 cloves garlic, halved lengthwise
    • 3-4 bell peppers, red or green, seeded and each cut into 6 long pieces
    • 3-4 fresh or dried chilies, halved lengthwise with scissors but left attached at the stem
    • 4 bay leaves
    • 2-3 tablespoons coarsely crushed coriander seeds

The Brine:

    • 1 quart white vinegar 

    • 1/2 cup water
    • 2 tablespoons honey 

    • 3 tablespoons salt
    • 2 cinnamon sticks

Rinse and quarter the larger tomatoes, discarding the hard stem. Halve the smaller ones. Place tomato pieces, peppers--sweet and hot--onion, garlic, and bay leaves in alternating layers to fill jars up to about 1/2 inch from the rim. Sprinkle with some coriander seeds.

In a stainless pot bring the vinegar, water, honey, salt, and cinnamon sticks to a boil. Stir to dissolve the honey and salt and remove from the heat. Discard the cinnamon sticks and pour enough brine to cover the vegetables in the jars, but still leaving 1/2 inch space at the top (leftover brine can be used for other pickles). Seal the jars and let stand for about 10 days before serving.

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Aglaia Kremezi writes about food in Greek, European, and American magazines, publishes books about Mediterranean cooking in the U.S. and Greece, and teaches cooking classes. More

Aglaia Kremezi has changed her life and her profession many times over. She currently writes about food in Greek, European and American magazines, publishes books about Greek and Mediterranean cooking in the US and in Greece, and teaches cooking to small groups of travelers who visit Kea. Before that she was a journalist and editor, writing about everything, except politics. She has been the editor in chief and the creator of news, women's, and life-style magazines, her last disastrous venture being a "TV guide for thinking people," a contradiction in terms, at least in her country. She studied art, graphic design, and photography at the Polytechnic of Central London. For five years she taught photography to graphic designers while freelancing as a news and fashion photographer for Athenian magazines and newspapers. Editors liked her extended captions more than the pieces the journalists submitted for the events she took pictures for, so she was encouraged to do her own stories, gradually becoming a full time journalist and editor. You can visit her website at www.keartisanal.com.


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