Recipe: Bacon and Tomato Macaroni

Though it's not the healthiest, one dish a week with cheese and cream is okay. Just add a big salad to the table.

    • 12 oz. uncooked macaroni (do not use the whole package, use 3/4)
    • 1/2 lb. smoked thick sliced bacon
    • 1 lb. sharp cheddar shredded cheese
    • 8 oz. mozzarella shredded cheese
    • 4 Roma tomatoes
    • 12 oz. frozen peas
    • 1/2 teas. minced garlic
    • 1 teas. minced fresh basil
    • 1 cup cream
    • 1 cup milk
    • 5 eggs
    • 1 teas. salt (or to taste)
    • 1 teas. cracked black pepper

Boil water and add macaroni for 10 minutes. Cook 2 minutes less than you would if you were going to eat immediately.

Dice bacon into one-inch pieces and cook until not quite crisp, then drain off excess oil.

In large mixing bowl add cream, milk, eggs, garlic, basil, salt, and pepper. Mix well with wire whisk. Make sure eggs are blended in.

Make sure macaroni is well drained, then toss it into the liquid mixture.

Add the sharp cheddar cheese and make sure it is mixed in.

Coat large casserole dish with spray oil and pour macaroni mixture into dish.

Slice Roma tomatoes and place on top of macaroni mixture.

Sprinkle mozzarella on top of tomatoes.

Sprinkle bacon on top of mozzarella.

Bake at 350 F for 35-40 minutes.

Presented by

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

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