Kenya's Eroding Food Culture

brevet_oct15_teaharvest_post.jpg

Photo by Pascale Brevet

In a country where approximately 80 percent of the population works in agriculture, Kenyans are deeply connected to the land. Through inheritance, a large majority own small plots called shamba. They otherwise work as casual laborers on farms. They eat either the crops they grow on their shamba or roots and vegetables grown in nearby fields and sold in local markets or on the side of the road. Yet, maize--a non-indigenous crop--s a staple food to more than 90 percent of Kenyans and the knowledge of growing native crops is rapidly disappearing.

Loss of traditions, disappearance of species and intensive agriculture are not particular to Kenya. What is specific to Kenya however, is the loss of pride in its culture and food. In 2004, in their first participation in the Terra Madre Slow Food event celebrating food traditions throughout the world, more than 50 Kenyans flew to Italy. "We were struck by how all the other participants were proud of their traditions and products," Samuel Muhunyu, the Kenyan coordinator of Network for Ecofarming in Africa, told me. "People from Asia, Europe or America were happy to share their indigenous foods and talk about them. And there we were, us Kenyans, unable to do the same. The food we eat today put our traditions in the shade. We forgot them, or rather we chose to do so to comply to a culture that wasn't ours."

Children long for Coca-Cola, though, far more than they do mursik, and for them food means maize and potatoes, not millet or sorghum.

Millet or sorghum used to be the core of a Kenyan diet, alongside other crops like cassava or yam, and it is still possible to find these foods in some places. I ate millet ugali with a Kalenjin family I visited near Olenguruone, and it was with them that I first tasted mursik, a traditional dairy specialty. A burnt stick of cromwo--a tree famous for its antiseptic properties--is rubbed inside a long and narrow hollow gourd made of dried squash. Cow's milk is then added and left to ferment for at least three days when the whey is drained, the container closed and shaken regularly. Ash gives the yogurt a smoky and slightly astringent taste, as well as a speckled gray color.

Children long for Coca-Cola, though, far more than they do mursik, and for them food means maize and potatoes, not millet or sorghum. Preceding generations consumed these western crops because they represented wealth and prestige. But there is no history or tradition attached to maize ugali. There are no stories to tell, no secret to pass down from generation to generation. Maize is brought to the mill to be ground into flour. Millet, on the other hand, used to be ground by hand before the mills appeared. A piece of hardened goat skin was laid on the floor to collect the flour. A flat stone was placed on top of it at an angle. Millet was poured in a curved piece of wood and shaken while blowing air on it to get rid of the dust. A bit of millet was then placed on the flat stone, and crushed by rubbing a smaller flat stone on it.

Presented by

Pascale Brevet is a French freelance writer, food consultant, and compulsive traveler. More

Pascale Brevet is a French freelance writer, food consultant, and compulsive traveler. After working for years as an executive at Christian Dior, she gave up her job and moved to Colorno, Italy, where she received a master's degree in Food Culture and Communication from UniSG. Most recently, she worked for NECOFA in Molo, Kenya, on food and nutrition security for HIV/AIDS patients.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Health

Just In