Recipe: Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast's Biscuits

I am specific about ingredients. They don't taste quite like my biscuits if you change the ingredients. I prefer Calumet Baking Powder and Land O' Lakes salted butter and salted margarine. Use regular buttermilk, not low fat.

Makes 2 dozen large or 3 dozen small.

    • 4 cups flour
    • ¼ cup baking powder
    • ¼ cup sugar
    • ¾ pound margarine (salted)
    • ¼ pound butter (salted)
    • 1¾ cups buttermilk

In a metal mixing bowl, add flour, baking powder and sugar. Blend well.

Cut margarine and butter into small cubes (½ inch).

Mix with dry ingredients and coat the margarine and butter well with the flour mixture.

Add buttermilk and mix into a dough. Do not overmix, there should be visible pieces of butter and margarine, that is what makes these biscuits flaky.

Flour a work space and roll out ¾ inch thick, fold and roll again. Repeat this process two to three times until you have a smooth dough. The dough will be layered with butter and margarine. Cut into rounds, whichever size you prefer. I prefer 2 inches.

Bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes or until golden brown. You may bake in muffin tins to brown evenly.

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Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of Regina's Table at Twin Oaks. More

Regina Charboneau is the owner of Twin Oaks Bed & Breakfast in Natchez, Mississippi. She is the author of two cookbooks: A Collection of Seasonal Menus & Recipes from Regina's Kitchen and Regina's Table at Twin Oaks.

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