Cheese, Chocolate, and BBQ For "Summer"

You might have heard that it's been raining in the Northeast. You might have read a newspaper like our own Globe, which ran this page-one story about June's "washing out all over."

But hope goes on, for all those vegetables come July, for heat maybe this week. Meanwhile, Daphne Zepos gives us an idea for how to choose and pair summer cheeses with the primeurs vegetables she found at her farmers' market--even if the current weather could easily ripen any cheese and encourage mold on the ones that aren't supposed to have it. And an idea for a salad that hurries summer up even with the green tomatoes that are the only honest ones anyone can find yet. This afternoon Ari Weinzweig tells us about a new color for barbecue that's old in South Carolina--yellow.

For escapism now as we wait for heat--I almost (almost) envied my New Orleans friend Brett Anderson when he began a note yesterday, "Greetings from the Big Sauna"--Alex Whitmore takes us to Chiapas as he searches for cacao to suit not only his Fair Trade imperatives but also the flavor profile he needs for his signature Taza chocolate bar. That bar with this cacao, he says, is coming next month. Meanwhile, waiting for the chill and rain to end, I'm going to search for some chocolate to keep me alert till then.

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Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." More

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." Julia Child once said, "I think he's a very good food writer. He really does his homework. As a reporter and a writer he takes his work very seriously." Kummer's 1990 Atlantic series about coffee was heralded by foodies and the general public alike. The response to his recommendations about coffees and coffee-makers was typical--suppliers scrambled to meet the demand. As Giorgio Deluca, co-founder of New York's epicurean grocery Dean & Deluca, says: "I can tell when Corby's pieces hit; the phone doesn't stop ringing." His book, The Joy of Coffee, based on his Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." In nominating his work for a National Magazine Award (for which he became a finalist), the editors wrote: "Kummer treats food as if its preparation were something of a life sport: an activity to be pursued regularly and healthfully by knowledgeable people who demand quality." Kummer's book The Pleasures of Slow Food celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995 and 1996 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He is also a frequent food commentator on television and radio. He was educated at Yale, immediately after which he came to The Atlantic. He is the recipient of five James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.

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