Recipe: Potatoes Riganates

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kremezi apr16 recipe potates.jpg

Photo by Aglaia Kremezi


Few people can resist these potatoes, which are capable of stealing the show from any food they accompany, even from the lamb--so make sure you have plenty for seconds.

Although it is served all over Greece, this dish is particularly good on islands like Naxos, or here on Kea, where the local potatoes have exceptional flavor. On the special days when a leg of lamb or a chicken is roasted, the potatoes are cooked in its juices.

If you want to cook this dish using small potatoes, there is no need to peel them, but I suggest that you halve them, because they taste best when they can absorb more sauce.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

    • 3 pounds baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
    • 1/2 cup olive oil
    • 4 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, crumbled
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 1/2 cup chicken stock
    • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    • 2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Place the potatoes in a single layer in a 13-by-9 inch baking dish and pour the oil over them. Add the garlic, dried oregano, salt and pepper to taste and toss well to coat with the oil. Bake the potatoes for 15 minutes. Add the stock, toss, and bake for 10 minutes more. Add the lemon juice, toss and bake for 10 to 15 minutes more, or until the potatoes are cooked through.

If you like, preheat the broiler and broil the potatoes for 2 to 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Sprinkle with the fresh oregano and serve at once.

Adapted from Foods of the Greek Islands (Houghton Mifflin).

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Aglaia Kremezi writes about food in Greek, European, and American magazines, publishes books about Mediterranean cooking in the U.S. and Greece, and teaches cooking classes. More

Aglaia Kremezi has changed her life and her profession many times over. She currently writes about food in Greek, European and American magazines, publishes books about Greek and Mediterranean cooking in the US and in Greece, and teaches cooking to small groups of travelers who visit Kea. Before that she was a journalist and editor, writing about everything, except politics. She has been the editor in chief and the creator of news, women's, and life-style magazines, her last disastrous venture being a "TV guide for thinking people," a contradiction in terms, at least in her country. She studied art, graphic design, and photography at the Polytechnic of Central London. For five years she taught photography to graphic designers while freelancing as a news and fashion photographer for Athenian magazines and newspapers. Editors liked her extended captions more than the pieces the journalists submitted for the events she took pictures for, so she was encouraged to do her own stories, gradually becoming a full time journalist and editor. You can visit her website at www.keartisanal.com.


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