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Compost is not necessarily the most inviting topic -- unless Carol Ann Sayle is writing about it. Her enthusiasm, patience, and charm make me want to go to Boggy Creek Farm, in Austin, a few days a week, and I'm just glad to get to go along guided by the sound of her voice.

Our man in Buenos Aires, Terrence Henry, is also a world diner with extensive Washington experience, as his thoughtful post today makes clear. If restaurant owners are to find a way out of the recession, these are some of the mildly wild ways they'll be able to do it (Watch for another opinion on this subject coming up very soon).

Do not miss Grant Achatz's cri de coeur on his growing disenchantment with what looks like a bag of tricks of food science and a term he uses only wryly and reluctantly, "molecular gastronomy." I'm fascinated with the new creative path he says he's looking for and will document with us. We're all lucky to be present at the creation.

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Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." More

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." Julia Child once said, "I think he's a very good food writer. He really does his homework. As a reporter and a writer he takes his work very seriously." Kummer's 1990 Atlantic series about coffee was heralded by foodies and the general public alike. The response to his recommendations about coffees and coffee-makers was typical--suppliers scrambled to meet the demand. As Giorgio Deluca, co-founder of New York's epicurean grocery Dean & Deluca, says: "I can tell when Corby's pieces hit; the phone doesn't stop ringing." His book, The Joy of Coffee, based on his Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." In nominating his work for a National Magazine Award (for which he became a finalist), the editors wrote: "Kummer treats food as if its preparation were something of a life sport: an activity to be pursued regularly and healthfully by knowledgeable people who demand quality." Kummer's book The Pleasures of Slow Food celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995 and 1996 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He is also a frequent food commentator on television and radio. He was educated at Yale, immediately after which he came to The Atlantic. He is the recipient of five James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.
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