Frederick M. Hess & Whitney Downs

Frederick M. Hess is a resident scholar and director of education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Whitney Downs is a research assistant in education policy at the American Enterprise Institute. More

Frederick M. Hess is the author of several books on education including The Same Thing Over and Over, Education Unbound, Common Sense School Reform, Revolution at the Margins, and Spinning Wheels. He pens the Education Week blog "Rick Hess Straight Up." Hess also serves as executive editor of Education Next, as lead faculty member for the Rice Education Entrepreneurship Program, on the Review Board for the Broad Prize in Urban Education, and on the Boards of Directors of the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, 4.0 SCHOOLS, and the American Board for the Certification of Teaching Excellence. A former high school social-studies teacher, he has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University, Rice University, and Harvard University. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Government from Harvard as well as an M.Ed. in Teaching and Curriculum.

Whitney Downs is a research assistant in education policy at the American Enterprise Institute. Her research focuses on school cost-cutting practices, the role of private enterprise and business engagement in public education, and the legal and structural barriers faced by education leaders. Her work has been published by National Review Online, The Daily Caller, and Education Next and has been featured by The Wall Street Journal Online and The Huffington Post. Downs graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. in sociology from Princeton University.

Frederick M. Hess & Whitney Downs: Magazine articles

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