Felix Frankfurter

  • The Case of Sacco and Vanzetti

    In 1921, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, both Italian-Americans, were convicted of robbery and murder. Although the arguments brought against them were mostly disproven in court, the fact that the two men were known radicals (and that their trial took place during the height of the Red Scare) prejudiced the judge and jury against them. On April 9, 1927, Sacco and Vanzetti's final appeal was rejected, and the two were sentenced to death. Felix Frankfurter, then a professor at Harvard Law School, was considered to be the most prominent and respectable critic of the trial. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1939

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Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

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What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

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Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

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How Is Social Media Changing Journalism?

How new platforms are transforming radio, TV, print, and digital

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The Place Where Silent Movies Sing

How an antique, wind-powered pipe organ brings films to life

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The Future of Iced Coffee

Are artisan businesses like Blue Bottle doomed to fail when they go mainstream?

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