The Man Who Burned Every Painting He Made Between 1953 and 1966

By Paul Rosenfeld

Meet John Baldessari. Called the “Godfather of Conceptual Art," his work has been described as cool, funny, cerebral, sardonic, and provocative. It has been showcased in museums across the world, from the Guggenheim to the Tate Modern in London. In this film, A Brief History of John Baldessari, narrated by Tom Waits and starring Baldessari himself, we go inside the seminal (and not-so-seminal) moments in the life of the prolific artist. Produced with inventive imagery, including moving images, stills, graphics, and animation, the six-minute film goes into everything from Baldessari's WiFi password to the three things every young artist should know.

The film is brought to you by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, two high school friends and co-founders of the production company Supermarché. They have several feature length films, including their critically acclaimed breakout documentary Catfish. They also dabble in short films. 

For more information on upcoming work from Joost and Schulman visit their website http://gosupermarche.com/.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/07/the-man-who-burned-every-painting-he-made-between-1953-and-1966/277814/