Arizona Immigration Bill: Controversy ... and Fashion

By Aylin Zafar
><

The Arizona legislature's new immigration bill has sparked considerable controversy. And where there's controversy, there's t-shirts. And tote bags. And bumper stickers. And...mouse pads. Clothing companies have seized the opportunity to market a whole range of products, and do-it-yourself types have found it the perfect time to exercise their "creativity."

For people who oppose the law:

In the case of American Apparel, whose founder Dov Charney is no stranger to controversy, the company is offering up "Legalize Arizona" t-shirts for free to any groups that are protesting the law.

az_amapparel2.jpg

American Apparel/Twitter

American Apparel has long been an advocate for reform of immigration laws in the U.S., marching each year in the May 1st Immigration March in downtown LA, where the company is based. The new campaign takes after their longstanding "Legalize LA" effort, of which the proceeds go to LA-based immigration rights groups.

But for those looking for something a bit more descriptive of their feelings toward the law, a myriad of options exist:


Some may like to take the laid back, reassuring approach when it comes to relaying a message to the feds, while others may opt for something more defensive:

az_illegalcollage2.jpg

cafepress.com



For some, shirts may be too bold a platform to display their outrage. For those craving more subtle ways to convey their feelings, perhaps they can consider a waterbottle or mug emblazoned with a swastika on Arizona's "new state flag":

az_mug_collage.jpg

cafepress.com



For people who support the law:

Mouse pads and tee-shirts are available for defenders of the new regulations:

az_fedcollage.jpg

cafepress.com



But be careful what you wear, because it might get you into trouble. After all, according to Rep. Brian Bilbray, even your shoes can give you away.

See web-only content:
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/04/arizona-immigration-bill-controversy-and-fashion/39713/

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/04/arizona-immigration-bill-controversy-and-fashion/39713/