'Words Have the Power to Transport You Across Time and Space'

Excerpts from a Twitter conversation with Rachel Cantor, the author of 1book140's July read A Highly Unlikely Scenario
Bacon and Bungay's Brazen Head, as imagined in Robert Greene's 16th-century play Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. (Wikipedia/Archive.org)

Yesterday, our Twitter Book Club held a live Q&A with Rachel Cantor, author of A Highly Unlikely Scenarioour July book. We discussed the novel's characters, including Leonard, a time-traveling pizza customer support representative who saves the world, and Abulafia, the 13th century Jewish mystic, who does awesome karate kicks and attempts to convert the Pope. 

Our conversation included reflections on the power of words, the importance of listening, and Roger Bacon's Brazen Head, a performing machine that gives answers and does surveillance. The full conversation is below.

For more in-depth conversations, read Rachel's other interviews in Publisher's Weeklythe Quietus, and Paste Magazine. Follow our ongoing conversation on the hashtag #1book140. Our August nomination process begins on Monday.

 

Presented by

J. Nathan Matias develops technologies for civic participation, media analytics, and creative learning at the MIT Media Lab and Center for Civic Media. He also co-facilitates @1book140, The Atlantic's Twitter book club.

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