Track of the Day (Premiere): Jensen Sportag’s 'Let the Queen Be the Boss'

Experimental pop with a sneakily feminist message
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Past Tracks

The pop/electronic duo Jensen Sportag released one of 2013’s most innovative yet slept-on albums, Stealth of Days. But while the collection didn’t get its just due, fans of Austin Wilkinson and Elvis Craig’s work should be thrilled that they’ve returned with a new single, “One Lane Lovers,” followed up by  “Let the Queen Be the Boss," premiering today at The Atlantic. The track is as meticulous and effervescent as anything on Stealth, though it shows off Jensen’s pop side far more than it does the left-of-center influences that dominated their work last year. At the same time, “pop” is a relative concept in the hands of such heady, inventive producers. “The song is in theme and style a feminist message about the idea of giving up control in order to gain power,” Wilkinson says via email. “‘Let the king be the beast / Let the queen be the boss.’”   

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Ryan Burleson is a writer based in New York City.

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